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Knee Replacement Surgery

Serious pain and the loss of the ability to walk can be caused by severe arthritis and knee injury. Surgery may be suggested by doctors to help those who are suffering from severe knee pain to alleviate it as well as improve their ability to walk. Partial knee replacement surgery is done through an opening that is cut into the area of the knee. Pieces of the tibia and femur, specifically where they join together, are removed. The portions that are removed are then replaced with artificial prosthetic material.

Depending on which prosthetic material is use, there could be a cementation to the knee bone. Certain materials do not need cement. They are instead eventually secured to the bone as is grows into them, with the bone itself acting as cement. When the operation is done, the skin is closed up. A drain may be temporarily put in place to remove excess fluid build up.

A knee replacement surgery is generally a safe option to relieve knee pain. Although, it is not without its risks and possible complications. However slight the odds of them may be, you need to know them just in case. The more informed you are, the more assistance you can give your doctor in heading off any potential complications. Some of the biggest risks are associated with anesthesia but may also include strokes, heart attacks, and pneumonia.

One of the major concerns are blood clots with in the legs. If they are going to appear it will happen with in the first several days following the surgery. Severe swelling and pain in the leg(s) are some signs of blood clots. The danger comes from the ability for the blood clot to come lose and travel from the leg to the lungs. Once in the lungs the blood clot may cause chest pain, shortness of breath, and, at worst, death. These symptoms may occur without warning.

It is vital that you let your doctor know at the first sign of any of the above issues to avoid a potential life threatening situation. One of the best way to prevent blood clots is to get out of bed and moving as soon as possible after your knee reconstruction surgery. There are also other complications and risks to knee surgery your doctor will talk to you about, these are just the major issues you can encounter.

When the operation is complete, you may have physical therapy that includes a passive, continuous motion machine. It is a machine that moves your leg(s) back and forth while you lay in bed. Its goal is to increase the mobility of your leg. Over time, and while working under the care of your physical therapist, you will be able to increase your activity level. Although, at first you may need to lean on a walker or cane to alleviate some of the pressure on your knee.

Eventually you will be able to walk without assistance. After time, you will be able to get back you regular activities as you get your knee stronger along with your leg and thigh muscles. Since you will need intensive physical therapy and your ability to get around will be limited, you may need to stay for a short period of time at a care facility to help assist in your recovery from surgery. If this is true in your case, workers at the hospital will assist you in making the necessary arrangements.

There are times when the knee is too badly damaged for several different reasons to simply replace parts of the knee. In these cases, the person may have such sever pain that they are unable to walk at all and the entire knee may need to be replaced. When the total knee is replaced, the parts that connect the tibia and femur are all totally replaced. The artificial parts used for replacement are call protheses. Regardless of which surgery is used, knee replacement surgery has been a very helpful solution in relieving the pain of suffers and improve their lives quality.

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